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Preventive Care

Early detection of illness or disease can make all the difference

When it comes to your health, some things are beyond your control. One thing that you can control is whether to visit your doctor for preventive care, such as yearly checkups, immunizations, health screenings and other services that can help detect illnesses or diseases before they become serious.

With your ConnectiCare plan, many preventive services are covered at no cost to you including no copayments, coinsurance or deductibles. The preventive care services must be provided by a participating provider and are subject to age and gender requirements and limitation rules.

Please refer to your membership agreement in your plan documents for a list of covered services under your specific plan.

Listed below you will find some of the recommended preventive health services based on age, gender and situation in life. These recommendations are recognized by the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Cancer Society, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

Recommended health screenings, immunizations and preventive services:

Alcohol screening and tobacco cessation

Counseling on breastfeeding

Breastfeeding benefits both you and your baby. Women who breastfeed their babies are less likely to develop breast or ovarian cancer. Babies who are breastfed have fewer infections of the ears, lungs and gastrointestinal system. These children are also less likely to develop asthma, Type 2 diabetes, and obesity as adults.

Rh factor screening

Rh factor screening is a simple blood test that checks if the infant’s blood type is compatible with the mother’s blood type. The screening tests for the presence of antibodies in the mother’s blood and lets the doctor know if additional medicine will be needed later in the pregnancy.

Screening for bacteria in the urine

Screening for gestational diabetes or diabetes during pregnancy

Screening for diabetes during pregnancy is a blood test for “sugar” and is recommended for all pregnant women who are at least 24 weeks pregnant. Uncontrolled diabetes during pregnancy can be harmful to both the mother and the infant. Screening for diabetes after 24 weeks of pregnancy can help identify women who may need to be treated for the condition and help reduce complications for you and your baby.

Screening for iron deficiency anemia*

Iron is needed by the red blood cells in order to carry oxygen efficiently to your body and to your growing baby. Iron deficiency anemia is very common during pregnancy and if left untreated it can cause low infant birth weight, preterm delivery, and an increased risk of serious problems during delivery. Current research indicates that iron deficiency in pregnant women may also be associated with an increased rate of depression after delivery.

Sexually transmitted disease (STD) counseling

Risk assessments and counseling are done for all sexually active females at risk.

  • Hepatitis B increases the risk of prematurity, low birth weight and death in the newborn. Screening for Hepatitis B is recommended to all women during the first pregnancy visit with the doctor or midwife.
  • Syphilis during pregnancy may cause miscarriages or premature labor. Screening is recommended during the first pregnancy visit with the doctor or midwife.
  • Gonorrhea at the time of delivery may lead to blindness in the newborn. It is recommended that all pregnant women age 24 and under and older women at an increased risk should be screened for Gonorrhea with a vaginal culture at the time of the first pregnancy visit with the doctor or midwife.
  • Chlamydia is a common infection among young women. Pregnant women who are age 24 and under or older women who are at a higher risk for the infection should be screened during the pregnancy. If left untreated, Chlamydia may lead to serious health problems, such as pelvic infections and infertility. Chlamydia during pregnancy increases the risk of premature birth, still birth, and infection. The test for Chlamydia is done either by a urine test or a vaginal culture.
  • HIV Infection – Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the virus that causes Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Having HIV during pregnancy increases the risk of developing other life threatening infections and increases the risk of transferring the virus to the infant via blood or breast milk. All pregnant women should be screened during the first pregnancy visit with the doctor or midwife.

*May be subject to a cost share.

Well-child exams

  • Your healthcare provider or doctor will evaluate your child’s physical development and growth patterns by measuring the height, weight, and head circumference (head size). This will help the provider determine how your child is growing.
  • Immunizations or “shots” to prevent the child from getting harmful and/or deadly diseases will also be given during well-child exams. Check out the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s immunization recommendations for children ages 0 to 6 years old.
  • Your healthcare provider or doctor will also evaluate your child’s eating, sleeping, brain and body development, and behavioral and social skills.
  • Parents will be given support and guidance by the provider/doctor on what they can expect as the child grows.

Autism screening performed by the child’s provider

Dental caries prevention

Hearing screening for newborns performed by the child’s provider

Hematocrit (Hct) or Hemoglobin (Hgb)

The child’s provider can test hematocrit or hemoglobin levels during a well-child exam. The test measures the amount of oxygen in the blood (Hemoglobin) carried by red blood cells or the amount of red blood cells (Hematocrit) in the blood.

Lead screening

The screening is done with a finger stick blood sample be sure your child has not been exposed to lead. Children exposed to lead may have problems with growth and development.

Newborn metabolic screening

At birth, a blood sample is taken from the baby to check for medical disorders that may be present.

Tuberculosis testing

Tuberculosis is an infection that usually affects the lungs and, if not treated, can lead to serious health issues. Some people with tuberculosis do not feel sick and can easily spread the infection to another person. If recommended by your provider, testing is done with a needle prick.

Vision screening

A vision screening may be completed during a well-child visit if recommended by the child’s provider.

Well-child exams

  • Your healthcare provider or doctor will evaluate your child’s physical development and growth patterns by measuring the height, weight, and head circumference (head size). This will help the provider determine how your child is growing.
  • Immunizations or “shots” to prevent the child from getting harmful and/or deadly diseases will also be given during well-child exams. Check out the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s immunization recommendations for children ages 0 to 6 years old and 7 to 18 years old.
  • Your healthcare provider or doctor will also evaluate the child’s eating, sleeping, brain and body development, and behavioral and social skills.
  • Parents will be given support and guidance by the provider/doctor on what they can expect as the child grows.

Blood pressure screening beginning at age 3 during a well-child exam

Depression Screening

Dental caries prevention

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening

Screening is done with a blood test to check for Hepatitis B in people at high risk for the infection. HBV can cause liver damage. It is transmitted through sexual contact with infected individuals or by sharing drug equipment.

Lead screening up to 6 years of age

The screening is done with a finger stick blood sample to be sure your child has not been exposed to lead. Children exposed to lead may have problems with growth and development.

Risk for alcohol, tobacco and drug use*

The healthcare provider or doctor will provide age appropriate counseling and recommendations (if necessary) for school-aged children or adolescents.

Screening for Obesity in Children and Adolescents

Recommended for children 6 years of age and older.

Sexually transmitted disease (STD) counseling

Risk assessments and counseling are done for all sexually active adolescent females and males.

Syphilis screening

Screening is done with a blood test for people who are at an increased risk for the infection. Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can lead to serious health problems including paralysis, blindness, and/or death.

Screening for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) for Adolescents*

The provider or doctor will screen for MDD if indicated. MDD in young people is a serious condition and may increase the risk of suicide if left untreated.

Tuberculosis testing

Tuberculosis is an infection that usually affects the lungs and, if not treated, can lead to serious health issues. Some people with tuberculosis do not feel sick and can easily spread the infection to another person. If recommended by your provider, testing is done with a needle prick.

Vision and hearing screening

A vision and hearing screening may be completed during a well-child visit if recommended by the child’s provider.


*May be subject to a cost share.

Screening and counseling for alcohol misuse

Blood pressure screening

Screening for high blood pressure is recommended for adults aged 18 years and older during a physical exam with your provider.

Colon cancer screening

Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women1. Early detection and treatment will usually result in a better long-term health outcome. Screening is recommended for individuals 50 to 75 years of age. There are multiple screening options available and each varies in the frequency of the testing. A fecal occult blood test must be completed yearly, a sigmoidoscopy is performed every five years, or a colonoscopy is performed every 10 years. A colonoscopy is the most effective screening to detect colorectal cancer.

Depression screening

Screening is recommended for all adults regardless of risk factors.

Diabetes screening

A blood test is used to check the blood sugar level. Adults who are overweight or obese should be screened for an abnormal blood sugar level as part of a cardiovascular risk assessment. People that have a family history or symptoms of diabetes should also be screened.

Diet counseling for people with risk factors for heart disease

Counseling is recommended for adults with elevated cholesterol levels, risk factors for heart disease, and/or other diet-related chronic conditions.

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening

Screening is done with a blood test to check for Hepatitis B in people at high risk for the infection. HBV can cause liver damage. It is transmitted through sexual contact with infected individuals or by sharing drug equipment.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening

Screening is done with a blood test to check for Hepatitis C in people at high risk for the infection. A one-time screening for the infection is also recommended for adults born between 1945 and 1965. HCV may lead to liver disease. It is often transmitted by sharing drug equipment, such as needles, with people infected by the virus.

HIV Infection screening

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the virus that causes Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Screening is done with a blood test for people who are at increased risk of infection.

Lipid screening

Screening is done with a blood test to measure LDL (bad cholesterol), HDL (good cholesterol) and triglyceride (common type of fat in the blood) levels. Your provider or doctor will order the screening based on your age and risk for heart disease.

Lung cancer screening

A low dose x-ray is recommended for adults aged 55 to 80 who have long smoking histories, who currently smoke, or who have quit within the last 15 years. Screening is not necessary if a person has not smoked for 15 years.

Obesity screening

The body mass index (BMI) measurement is based on your height and weight during a physical exam with your provider. BMI is used to evaluate whether you are overweight.

Sexually transmitted disease (STD) counseling

Risk assessments and counseling are done for all sexually active females and males at risk.

Syphilis screening

Screening is done with a blood test for people who are at an increased risk for the infection. Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can lead to serious health problems including paralysis, blindness, and/or death.

Tobacco cessation

Immunizations: Check out the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s immunization recommendations for adults 19 years of age and older.

BRCA testing

BRCA testing may be suggested for women with a personal or family history associated with an increased risk for breast cancer. The BRCA gene test is a blood test that checks for changes in your genes, or genetic make-up, that may increase the risk for breast cancer.

Breast cancer screening

A low-dose x-ray procedure (mammography) that shows the inside of the breast is used to screen for breast cancer. Talk to your provider about breast cancer risks and prevention to determine when and how frequently a mammography is needed for you.

Cervical cancer screening

A Pap test, typically done as part of a routine gynecologic exam, is used to screen for cervical cancer. The Pap test looks for changes in the cells lining the cervix that might lead to cancer.

Chlamydia testing

Testing is recommended for all sexually active women age 24 and under or older women who are at an increased risk for the infection. If left untreated, Chlamydia may lead to serious health problems, such as pelvic infections and infertility. This screening is done either through a urine test or a vaginal culture during the Pap test.

Domestic and interpersonal violence screening

Screening is recommended for women of childbearing age.

Gonorrhea testing

Testing is recommended for all sexually active women 24 years and younger, and for older women who are at an increased risk for infection. If left untreated, it may lead to serious health problems, such as pelvic infections and infertility. This screening is done through a vaginal culture.

Osteoporosis screening

Osteoporosis is a condition that causes thinning of the bones and increases the risk of bone fractures (broken bones). Osteoporosis can be painlessly detected with a bone mineral density test, which is recommended for women at an increased risk for the bone disease. Some risk factors for osteoporosis include a small body frame, Caucasian descent, post-menopause, a history of tobacco and alcohol use, and a family history of the condition.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) screening

This is a one-time screening with ultrasonography in men between the ages of 65 and 75 years old who have any history of ever smoking. An AAA is an enlarged area or bulge in the main artery of the heart that carries blood to the lower body. Complications of the aneurysm include the formation of blood clots and rupturing of the vessel, which can be life-threatening.

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